What should you do if you don't receive a parcel from a retailer?

There appears to be no end to the rise in popularity of online shopping.
The number of packages being delivered by online retailers in the UK is growing all the time. The majority of these packages are delivered with great efficiency, but sometimes a customer's expectations might not be met.
If a parcel turns up late or fails to arrive at a customer's delivery address at all, consumers are entitled to compensation under the Sale of Goods Act 1979.
This act states that consumers should expect to receive their goods in a reasonable amount of time. The definition of 'reasonable' is dependent on several factors but most importantly the original estimate for delivery provided.
This is especially true on 'express delivery' and 'next-day' delivery services which promise delivery by a certain date.
In this case, it's more than reasonable to expect to be able to return the product if it does arrive and gain a full refund of the product including postage costs both to and from your house.

What to do

It's important to get in touch with the retailer who you bought the items from and explain that the parcel is either late or hasn't been delivered.
Make it clear that they are in breach of the Sale of Goods Act by failing to deliver the goods within a reasonable time. From there, you can either request a refund or threaten to do so if the goods don't arrive by a certain date.
Ideally, you will be able to speak to a member of staff over the phone, so you can confirm that your complaint was upheld. However, an email or social media message will also suffice.

When your package turns up

Often, consumers order parcels expecting them to arrive before a certain event. If the parcel is delivered late after the event has passed, a consumer has the right to a full refund if they send the product back.
If they want to keep the product, they still have a right to a refund of the extra money they paid for faster postage. Once again, this should be requested via contact with the retailer.
The Sale of Goods Act states that the parcel remains the responsibility of the retailer until it is received by the consumer, so don't let them try and pass the blame to you or the courier.
By making it clear that you know your rights as a consumer, you should have no problem getting the refund you deserve. 

Copyright © 2016 UKMail Group PLC. All rights reserved. Read our Privacy Policy and Terms and Conditions. (v4.8.0)

Please note if you do not select the “signature required” delivery option, UKMail will not be liable should your items be subsequently lost or damaged after the delivery (see clause 11.7 of the Terms & Conditions). *We define a “Parcel” as a package with dimensions up to 80cm x 80cm x 80cm and a weight of up to 25kg.

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